Histamine Intolerance

We all have an enzyme (diamine oxidase) which breaks down any histamine that we absorb from a histamine-containing food. When we eat a food which contains histamine it does not affect us. However, some people have a low level of this enzyme. When they eat too many histamine-rich foods they may suffer ‘allergy-like’ symptoms such as headaches, rashes, itching, diarrhoea, and vomiting or abdominal pain. This is called histamine intolerance.

Foods that are particularly high in histamine and other vasoactive amines include:

Champagne, wine, beer, cider and other fermented drinks and spirits

Sauerkraut and other pickled foods

Vinegar and foods containing it such as dressings, pickles, mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard

Tofu and soya sauce

Parmesan cheese and other cheeses

Sausages and other processed meats (ham, salami, gammon, bacon)

Mushrooms and quorn

Tinned and smoked fish (tuna, salmon, herring) and crustaceans

Prepared salads

Tinned vegetables

Dried fruit, seeds, nuts

Yeast extract, yeast

Chocolate, cocoa, cola

Certain foods (even food that is low in histamine) can stimulate the release of histamine from mast cells in your body (a type of immune cell). These foods include:

Bananas

Tomatoes

Strawberries

Nuts

Peanuts

Shellfish

Egg white

Chocolate

Pumpkin

Spinach

Aubergines

Avocado

Papayas

Kiwi

Pineapple

Mango

Raspberry

Tangerines

Grapefruits

Red prunes

Pea

Spices

via Histamine Intolerance – Allergy UK.

potential rosacea food triggers

  • Liver
  • Yogurt
  • Sour cream
  • Cheese (except cottage cheese)
  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Soy sauce
  • Yeast extract (bread is OK)
  • Vinegar
  • Eggplant
  • Avocados
  • Spinach
  • Broad-leaf beans and pods,
    including lima, navy or pea
  • Citrus fruits, tomatoes, bananas,
    red plums, raisins or figs
  • Spicy and thermally hot foods
  • Foods high in histamine
  • Alcohol, especially red wine,
    beer, bourbon, gin, vodka or champagne
  • Hot drinks, including hot cider,
    hot chocolate, coffee or tea